Anstruther

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Clan Anstruther is a Scottish chiefly family, based in Fife.

Origins

Alexander I of Scotland granted the lands of Anstruther to William de Candela in the early 12th century.<ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p66</ref>There are a number of suggested origins for William but research points to the Normans in Italy.<ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p66</ref> It is known that William I of England sought assistance from William, Count of Candela, who sent his son. It is likely that this son was William de Candela, who received the grant of land from Alexander. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p66</ref>William de Candela's son, also William, was a benefactor to the monks of Balmerino Abbey.] The site now occupied by the Scottish Fisheries Museum in Anstruther was a gift from William. The next generation of the family, Henry, no longer styled himself, de Candela, being described as 'Henricus de Aynstrother dominus ejusdem' in a charter confirming grants of land to Balmerino Abbey.<ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p66</ref>His son, another Henry, accompanied Louis IX of France to the crusades and swore fealty to King Edward I of England in 1292 and again in 1296. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p66</ref>

History

In the fifteenth century Andrew Anstruther of Anstruther fought at the Battle of Flodden in 1513.<ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p66</ref> He married Christina Sandilands who was descended from Sir James Sandilands of Calder and Princess Jean, daughter of Robert II. His younger son, David, fought with the King of France at the Battle of Pavia in 1520 and his descendants became French nobility, their line dying out with the death of the last Baron d'Anstrude in 1928.<ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p66</ref> Later in the fifteenth century, the family's association with Regent Morton led to a young member of the family being chosen as a companion to the young James IV, gaining the Office of Hereditary Grand Carver.

In 1595 he became Master of the Household. His son, William, accompanied the king to England following the Union of the Crowns and was made a Knight of the Bath and Gentleman of the Bedchamber to James IV. His younger brother, Sir Robert, was a Privy Councillor and Ambassador to Denmark and the Holy Roman Empire. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p67</ref> His son, Sir Philip succeeded at Anstruther and fought on the Royalist side during the War of the Three Kingdoms, receiving Charles II following his coronation at Scone.

As a result his property was confiscated later that year by Parliament when he was taken prisoner at Worcester. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, p67</ref>The family returned to favour during the Restoration, with a number pursuing high profile judicial careers. In the early eighteenth century the baronets of Anstruther were typically military men and Members of Parliament. More recently the incumbent for many years was Ian Anstruther (1922-2007) a wealthy eccentric and writer. <ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Anstruther</ref>

The chief's seat is still at Balcaskie in Fife- a house built around 1670 by Sir William Bruce. The current Chief of Clan Anstruther is Tobias Alexander Campbell Anstruther. <ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Anstruther</ref>

References

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