Fullarton

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Clan Fullarton are a Scottish family or kin-group which does not have a chief recognised by the Lord Lyon and is therefore considered an armigerous clan.
The arms of Fullarton of that Ilk as shown in Nisbet's System of Heraldry (1722)

Origins

This name might be a derivation of 'fowler' and therefore relates to the keeping of birds. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, 391</ref> It might also come from 'fuller' which means a bleacher of cloth. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref> This family is said to be of Anglo-Saxon or Norman Origin. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref>

The first record of this name is towards the end of the thirteenth century Alunus de Fowlerton founded and endowed a convent of Carmelite or White Friars at Irvine. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref> The name is still associated with an area of the modern town of Irvine. <ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fullarton</ref>

Middle Ages

Adam de Fowlerton recieved a charter to the lands of Fowlerton from James, High Steward of Scotland, between 1283 and 1309.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref> Fergus de Foulertoun received the estate of Kilmichael in Arran, and this was confirmed by a charter from Robert III in 1391. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref>

Reginald de Fowlertoun of that Ilk was taken prisoner by the English at the Battle of Durham in 1346 and remained in England for many years. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref>

The family remained in royal favour and continued to extend their lands. John Fullarton of Fullarton married the daughter of a relative, Fullerton of Dreghorn. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref>The main family were known from then on as 'Fullarton of Dreghorn'.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref>

Sixteenth Century

Adam Fullarton (d.in of after 1595) was a religious activist and administrator. He was a member of the Fullarton of Dreghorn family. <ref>Michael Lynch, ‘Fullarton, Adam (d. in or after 1595)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref> While a burgess of Edinburgh Fullarton became involved in religious agitation with John Knox. In 1566 he was one of the burgesses implicated in the murder of Queen Mary's confessor, John Black, on the same night that David Rizzio, her secretary, was murdered. <ref>Michael Lynch, ‘Fullarton, Adam (d. in or after 1595)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

Described as 'an uncompromising radical' he was also an English agent counting leading members of Elizabeth I's government among his contacts. <ref>Michael Lynch, ‘Fullarton, Adam (d. in or after 1595)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref> He was imprisoned in Dumbarton Castle in following the 'Black Acts' of 1584 and his part in the welcome to Edinburgh of the radical minister John Durie.<ref>Michael Lynch, ‘Fullarton, Adam (d. in or after 1595)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

Seventeenth Century

In August 1662 William Fullarton of that Ilk petitioned the Edinburgh Parliament for protection against imprisonment for debt. <ref>The Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707, K.M. Brown et al eds (St Andrews, 2007-2014), date accessed: 22 May 2014</ref>

Thomas Fullertoun invested £100 in the disastrous Darien scheme of the 1690s. He is described as 'late commander of the William and Mary frigate'. <ref>James Samuel Barbour, A History of William Paterson and the Darien Company, 266</ref>

Eighteenth Century

Fullarton House was built by a later William Fullarton of that Ilk in 1745 and altered by his son, however it was demolished in 1966 by the council who had been unable to maintain the building after purchasing it in 1928. The stables had been built in the 1790s and were converted to flats in 1974. <ref>David McClure (2002). Ayrshire in the Age of Improvement. Ayrshire Monographs 27. Ayr Arch & Nat Hist Soc. 166</ref>

Nineteenth Century

Memorial in Irvine to William Fullarton of Fullarton

Sir Archibald Fullarton of Kilmichael served in the Penisular War (1808-14) and was severely wounded at the Battle of Salamanca.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref>

William Fullarton of Fullarton (1754-1808) was a politician and colonial governor, agriculturist and member of parliament. <ref>Michael Fry, ‘Fullarton, William, of Fullarton (1754–1808)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

As governor of Trinidad Fullarton came into conflict with Lt. Colonel Thomas Picton, who had ruled the island since its capture from the Spanish by Sir Ralph Abercromby in 1797. When Fullarton asked for an account of all the criminal proceedings which had taken place in the island since Picton had been there, Picton resigned in disgust. Fullarton persisted in his inquiries, and the result of them was the trial of Picton for inflicting torture on a Spanish girl, Luisa Calderon, to extort a confession from her.

This trial caused a public sensation in England. In February 1806, Picton was found guilty. Fullarton was attacked in print by Edward Alured Draper. Picton applied for a new trial, at which he was acquitted; but before it started Fullarton died of inflammation of the lungs at Gordon's Hotel, London, on 13 February 1808. He was buried at Isleworth.

William Fullarton of Fullarton had one daughter. <ref>Michael Fry, ‘Fullarton, William, of Fullarton (1754–1808)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 22 May 2014</ref> It is uncertain at present who inherited the chiefship.

John Fullarton, second son of the Laird of Carstairs, became a Supreme Court judge in 1829 and took the title 'Lord Fullerton'. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 391</ref>

In 1805 the Ayrshire estate was sold to the Duke of Portland. <ref>A.H. Millar (1885). The Castles and Mansions of Ayrshire, 80</ref>

References

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