Galloway

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Clan Galloway are a Scottish kin-group or family who do not have a chief and are therefore considered an armigerous clan. While many notable Scots have had this surname, Galloway does not appear have a chiefly tradition based around a core aristocratic or gentry family- and it is unclear who Galloway of that Ilk was.

Origins

A territorial name from the former Celtic princedom and the modern district in south west Scotland. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, 392</ref>In the early medieval period various areas of Scotland took their name from the tribes who inhabited them: the Gall Ghadihil- literal translation 'stranger Gaels'. <ref>David Dorward, Dictionary of Scottish Surnames, 107</ref>

Middle Ages

Sande Galloway was involved in a brawl in Lanark in 1488. <ref>Dorward, Surnames, 107</ref>

Sixteenth Century

The surname can be found in Dumbartonshire from about the mid-sixteenth century. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 392</ref> Other families with this name later appeared on the east coast of Scotland.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 392</ref> Patrick Galloway (1551-1626), originally from Dundee, was a prominent Presbyterian cleric during the reign of James IV. <ref>Richard L. Greaves, ‘Galloway, Patrick (c.1551–1626)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 May 2014</ref>

Seventeenth Century

Christopher Galloway (1621-1645) was an architect, engineer and clockmaker. He spent his career in Russia working on various structures, including a celebrated clock for Saviour's Tower in the Kremlin, as well as the Kremlin's water supply. <ref> Jeremy Howard, ‘Galloway, Christopher (fl. 1621–1645)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 May 2014</ref> He may have been a descendant of Christopher Galloway(d.1570) a Burgess of Haddington.<ref> Jeremy Howard, ‘Galloway, Christopher (fl. 1621–1645)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 May 2014</ref>

Eighteenth Century

Robert Galloway (1752-1794) was the author of 'Poems, Epistles and Songs in the Scottish Dialect'. Originally a shoemaker , he became a bookseller and librarian in Glasgow. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 392</ref>

Nineteenth Century

Janet Galloway (1841-1909)

General Sir Archibald Galloway (1780-1850) was a soldier and colonial adventurer who served in the East India Company for thirty five years, rising to become its chairman in 1849. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 392</ref>George Alexander Galloway (1776–1847) was a radical agitator and engineer, a key figure in early trade unions and later a London city Councillor. <ref>Michael T. Davis, ‘Galloway, Alexander (1776–1847)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2013 accessed 27 May 2014</ref>John Galloway (1804–1894) was an iron founder and engineer known for constructing equipment for Britain's early railways. <ref>Ronald M. Birse, ‘Galloway, John (1804–1894)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 27 May 2014</ref>

Janet Anne Galloway (1841–1909) was a promoter of higher education for women in Scotland and a founder of Queen Margaret College in Glasgow, the first university in Scotland which accepted female students. She was the daughter of Alexander Galloway, an estate factor originally from Stirlingshire, and his wife, Anne. <ref>Lesley M. Richmond, ‘Galloway, Janet Anne (1841–1909)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 May 2014</ref> Unusually for the time she was highly educated at the insistence of her father, who also trained her in business methods. Finding few educational or career options open to women in late-nineteenth century Scotland, Janet became an active advocate of female education. In 1883 she became first secretary of Queen Margaret College.<ref>Lesley M. Richmond, ‘Galloway, Janet Anne (1841–1909)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 May 2014</ref> In 1892 government legislation amalgamated Queen Margaret College with the University of Glasgow and Galloway became a university official. <ref>Lesley M. Richmond, ‘Galloway, Janet Anne (1841–1909)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 May 2014</ref> Janet Galloway was described as being blunt and having a 'ready fearless wit and kind eye'- with a personality that mixed conservative instinct and progressive act. <ref>Lesley M. Richmond, ‘Galloway, Janet Anne (1841–1909)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 May 2014</ref> She continued working, refusing to accept pay, until her death in 1909. She is commemorated by a memorial window in the University of Glasgow's Bute Hall. The tradition of Queen Margaret College was continued by the Queen Margaret Union, originally the University's female student union. Although both unions have been open to both sexes since the 1960s the University of Glasgow is almost exceptional in having two rival student unions.

Twentieth Century

Lieutenant-General Sir Alexander Galloway (1895–1977) was an officer in the British Army during World War I and World War II. He was particularly highly regarded as a staff officer and as such had an influential role in the outcome of Operation Crusader in 1941. George Galloway (b.1954) is a controversial British politician, at one time MP for Hillhead in Glasgow. Janice Galloway (b.1955) is a writer of novels, short stories, prose-poetry, non-fiction and libretti. Her novels include Foreign Parts (1994) Clara (2002) and her highly regarded memoirs This is Not About Me (2008) and All Made Up (2011).

References

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