Haliburton

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Haliburton is a Scottish kin-group or family who do not have a chief and are therefore considered an armigerous clan.

Origins

A territorial name taken from land in Berwickshire. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, 400</ref> These lands were at first called Burton or Burghton until a chapel was built there and the name became Holy or Holyburton. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 400</ref>

Nisbet preferred the view that the church took its name from a holy man called Burton.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 400</ref>

The family held land in Edinburghshire, Berwickshire, Perthshire, and Angus, but their main estate became Dirleton in Haddingtonshire. <ref>Alan R. Borthwick, ‘Haliburton family (per. c.1375–c.1500)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

Middle Ages

Walterus de Halyburton donated to the Abbey of Kelso in 1176.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 400</ref> His grandson Sir Henry Halyburton, swore allegience to Edward I of England in 1296.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref> Sir Henry's grandson was taken prisoner by the English at the Battle of Durham in 1346 and was finally ransomed with David II in 1357.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref>

Sir Walter Haliburton (c.1375-1446?) became Lord High Treasurer of Scotland in 1439 and a year later a Lord of Parliament with the title Lord Haliburton of Dirleton.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref>He had earlier been a hostage for James I in England. He had earlier married Isobel, daughter of Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany (d.1420)<ref>Alan R. Borthwick, ‘Haliburton family (per. c.1375–c.1500)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

As son in law to the Duke of Albany he was unlikely to receive support from James I and his advancement came only after the king's assassination in 1437. <ref>Alan R. Borthwick, ‘Haliburton family (per. c.1375–c.1500)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

The family did not remain at the centre of politics for long. In 1536 Mark Haliburton was secretary to the Earl of Douglas and developed a career at court during the reign of James II, but was later executed for unknown reasons. <ref>Alan R. Borthwick, ‘Haliburton family (per. c.1375–c.1500)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

John, second Lord Halyburton married Janet, daughter of Sir Robert Seaton of Seaton and their two sons bore the family title. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref>

Dirleton Castle

Dirleton Castle

The Haliburtons had gained Dirleton Castle through marriage around 1350. They carried out extensive building works including heightening towers and building a gatehouse. <ref>Mike Salter, The Castles of Lothian and the Borders, 41-42</ref>

Sixteenth Century

The sixth Lord Halyburton died in 1506 and was survived by three daughters one of whom married William Lord Ruthven and the title descended through Lady Ruthven.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref>

Mariotta Haliburton, Lady Home, was a 16th-century Scottish noblewoman who is remembered for her defence and negotiation of the surrender of the Castle of Hume after the Battle of Pinkie. She was the daughter of Patrick Haliburton of Dirleton. <ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariotta_Haliburton</ref>

James Halyburton of Pitcur (1518-1529) was Provost of Dundee for thirty-three years, from 1550 until 1583.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref>A religious reformer, he was an active opponent of Mary, Queen of Scots and fought against her at the Battle of Langside. <ref>Annette M. Smith, ‘Halyburton, James (1518–1589)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref> During the minority of James VI he held various posts, including that of advisor to Regent Moray in 1572. <ref>Annette M. Smith, ‘Halyburton, James (1518–1589)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

His eventual decline followed an implication in the Ruthven Raid in 1582 in which James IV was imprisoned by conspirators. When the king regained his freedom Halyburton was forced to give up a lucrative office and James instructed the burgesses of Dundee to not to re-elect him. <ref>Annette M. Smith, ‘Halyburton, James (1518–1589)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>Despite this Halyburton remained Provost until his death in 1589. <ref>Annette M. Smith, ‘Halyburton, James (1518–1589)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

Seventeenth Century

Sir George Halyburton became Lord President of the Court of Session in 1642 and had earlier been knighted by Charles I at Holyrood. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref>

George Haliburton, minister (1616-1645) became Bishop of Dunkeld in 1662 as part of Charles II's reinstatement of episcopacy. He was a strict opponent of noncomformists who included his relative, George Haliburton, minister of Aberdalgie. <ref>Tristram Clarke, ‘Haliburton, George (c.1616–1665)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

A further George Haliburton (1635-1715) was an Episcopalian clergyman who became Bishop of Aberdeen. Following the reinstatement of Presbyterianism Haliburton was deprived of his see in 1698 but continued to act as bishop. He attended the raising of James Stuart's standard in 1715 despite old age and infirmity, dying a few weeks later. <ref>Tristram Clarke, ‘Haliburton, George (1635?–1715)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 22 May 2014</ref>

Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

James Haliburton, or Burton (1761-1837) was a London builder and developer of Scottish descent. Described as a direct, shrewd and energetic man, he was involved with the London building projects of John Nash. <ref>Roger Bowdler, ‘Burton , James (1761–1837)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2009 accessed 22 May 2014</ref> His brother, James Burton, was an Egyptologist who made two surveys of monuments there in 1824 and 1830-5. <ref>http://venn.lib.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/search.pl?sur=&suro=c&fir=&firo=c&cit=&cito=c&c=all&tex=%22HLBN805J%22&sye=&eye=&col=all&maxcount=50</ref> He died in Edinburgh in 1862 and was buried with the epitaph "a zealous investigator in Egypt of its language and antiquities. <ref> http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/egyptologists.htm</ref>Sir Brenton Halliburton (1774–1860) was an army officer, lawyer, judge and politician who became Chief Justice of Canada. <ref>http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio.php?id_nbr=3949</ref>

References

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