Halket

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Halket or Halkett are a Scottish kin-group or family who do not have a chief and are therefore considered an armigerous clan.

Origins

It is thought this family take their name from the lands of Halkhead in Renfrewshire. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Fmaily Encyclopedia, 401</ref> Black suggests that the place name might have originally meant Hawk-wood. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref>

Establishing the origin of the name is however made more complex by the existence of twenty-nine documented spellings. <ref>David Dorward, Dictionary of Scottish Surnames, 130</ref>

Middle Ages

Sir Henry Hackett witnessed a charter in 1230.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 401</ref>

The Halkett family of Pitfirran have held lands in Fife since the fourteenth century. They were already established when they obtained the lands of Luphannan and Ballingall by charter of David II around 1370. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 402</ref> Philip Hagat, Lord of Ballinagall is recorded in 1370.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 402</ref>

Sixteenth Century

Sir Robert Halket of Pitfirrane was knighted by James IV and his eldest son, Sir James, supported the Covenaters during the reign of Charles I, raising his own cavalry regiment. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 402</ref> He was MP for Fife. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 402</ref>

John Halket is recorded at Dysart in Fife in the mid-sixteenth century. <ref>Doward, Surnames, 130</ref> Robert Holkat was recorded at Culross.<ref>Doward, Surnames, 130</ref>

Sir Charles Halket was created a baronet in 1662 but his line ended in an heiress, Janet, who married Sir Peter Wedderburn of Gosford, who was obliged to assumed the name Halket. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 402</ref>

Eighteenth Century

George Halkett (1692-1756) was a Jacobite songwriter and schoolmaster. He attended the University of Aberdeen and later became a schoolmaster near Fraserburgh. He was associated with leading episcopalian families in the area such as the Frasers of Philorth. <ref>William Donaldson, ‘Halket, George (bap. 1692, d. 1756)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref> However he is best known as the composer of songs such as 'A Dialogue between the Devil and George II’- which allegedly caused the Duke of Cumberland to offer a reward for its author dead or alive. <ref>William Donaldson, ‘Halket, George (bap. 1692, d. 1756)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref>

Lady Elizabeth Wardlaw (nee. Halket) was the daughter of Sir Charles Halket of Pitfirran. <ref>Mary Ellen Brown, ‘Wardlaw , Elizabeth, Lady Wardlaw (1677–1727)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref> Described as 'a a woman of elegant accomplishments...who had much wit and humour, Elizabeth was a poet who authored the imitation ballad 'Hardyknute' which later became the subject of much antiquarian controversy. <ref>Mary Ellen Brown, ‘Wardlaw , Elizabeth, Lady Wardlaw (1677–1727)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref>

Nineteenth Century

General Sir Colin Halket commanded a brigade of the German legion during the Penisular War. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 402</ref> He was later severely wounded at the Battle of Waterloo. Sir Peter Halket served in the Crimean War. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 402</ref> The baronetcy became extinct in 1904.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 402</ref>

References

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