Herries

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Herries

Herries are a Scottish kin-group and family who do not have a chief recognised by the Lord Lyon and are therefore considered an armigerous clan.

Origin

This family is said to descend from the Counts of Vendome in France, who bore three hedgehogs (French: herrisons) on their shield of arms. <ref>George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia, 404</ref> Chambers suggests that the Scottish Herries might be a branch of the Ango-Norman family of Heriz, from Wyverton in Nottinghamshire, who came to Scotland during the reign of David II. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref>

Middle Ages

Nigel de Heriz witnessed charters before 1152.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref> Nigel de Heris held lands in Ettrick during the reign of Alexander II.

William de Herris swore fealty to Edward I of England and appears on the Ragman Roll of 1296 for his lands in Dumfriesshire.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref>

Sir Herbert Herries of Terregles was arrested with Murdoch, Duke of Albany in 1425 but was later released.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref> He accompanied Princess Margaret of Scotland when she travelled to France to marry the heir to the French throne.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref>

Her brother, John Herries, was hanged as a result of a dispute with the powerful Earl of Douglas.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref> Sir Hubert Herries of Terregles was a Lord of Parliament in 1498 with the title ‘Lord Herries’.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref> His son, Andrew, second Lord Herries, died at the Battle of Flodden along with many others.

Herbert Herries, First Lord Herries of Terregles (1460- 1503) was a figure at the courts of James III and James IV. It is thought this family had some kind of hereditary illness. <ref>Michael A. Penman, ‘Herries, Herbert, first Lord Herries of Terregles (b. c.1460, d. in or after 1503)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref>

In 1478 Herries, along with other close relatives, acted on behalf of his grandfather, who was 'incompos mentis'. <ref>Michael A. Penman, ‘Herries, Herbert, first Lord Herries of Terregles (b. c.1460, d. in or after 1503)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref>

Hubert was knighted in 1493 and was elevated to 'Lord Terregles' in 1483.<ref>Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/54233?docPos=2 (accessed 21st May 2014)</ref> This may have been for his role in maintaining royal authority in the southwest of Scotland.<ref>Michael A. Penman, ‘Herries, Herbert, first Lord Herries of Terregles (b. c.1460, d. in or after 1503)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref>

Herries and his wife, Mariot Carlyle had four sons and one daughter.<ref>Michael A. Penman, ‘Herries, Herbert, first Lord Herries of Terregles (b. c.1460, d. in or after 1503)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref>

Fifteenth Century

William, the third lord, died in 1543 and the title went to his daughter Agnes, who married Sir John Maxwell, who was a younger son of Robert, Lord Maxwell. <ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref> The Maxwells later became Lords of Nithsdale and quartered the arms of Herries with their own.<ref>Plean, Squire, Encyclopedia, 404</ref>

Eighteenth Century

Sir Robert Herries (1731-1815) was a London merchant and banker. He was the eldest son of William Herries of Halldykes, in Dryfesdale, Dumfriesshire. <ref>John Booker, ‘Herries, Sir Robert (c.1731–1815)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 21 May 2014 </ref>

Nineteenth Century

John Charles Herries

John Charles Herries (1778-1855) was a financier and British politician during the early nineteenth century, who served in the ministry of Lord Canning and was Chancellor of the Exchequer for 1827 and 1828. He was descended from the Dumfriesshire family. <ref>P. J. Jupp, ‘Herries, John Charles (1778–1855)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 21 May 2014</ref> Herries married Sarah Dorrington in 1814 and had three sons, one of whom, Sir Charles Herries, became a well known financier.

References

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